From the Education Committee

As my 2019-2021 term, as one of the Educational Directors draws nearer to the end I wanted to reflect on this time.   Like everyone else I thought this commitment would be the usual experiences of some in-person conferences and some telephone meetings.

LLNE has two Educational Directors.   Each serves two years with the terms ending on different years.   My term started in July 2019.    I did not attend the annual AALL meeting in 2019 in Washington, D.C. as I was at a family reunion.   I was without a care and thought I would attend the meeting in July of 2020 in Cincinnati.  

One strange thing about being one of the co-Educational Directors is attending meetings and thanking hosts for work done by previous Educational Directors.    My first LLNE Conference as Educational Director was hosted by the Harvard Law Library and was on Artificial Intelligence and Algorithms in Law Libraries and Legal Practice.   Little did we know this was the last in-person conference that would be planned for a long time.

One of the many wonderful experiences working with LLNE has been meeting so many dynamic and creative law librarians.  There was a resilience and a commitment to moving forward during challenging times.  LLNE leadership stepped up as COVID-19 protocols were put in place and planned a virtual spring 2020 conference.    Summer gave way to fall and COVID-19 would not allow an in person conference.  So, the University of Connecticut Law Library planned a virtual Fall Conference.  Suffolk will host a virtual conference in the late spring of this year.   

We will meet virtually for the AALL Annual Meeting this summer.   When the new academic year starts and the leaves fall again LLNE will again plan and host the meeting.  The traditions will continue.  

– Maureen

From The Education Committee

One of the LLNE Education Committee’s tasks includes finding institutions to host the LLNE semi-annual Meetings.    Each spring and fall LLNE holds an educational conference and chapter business meeting.  This tradition goes back to 1948.  

During Covid-19 LLNE has continued this tradition.  In spring of 2020 LLNE hosted a virtual meeting and in the fall of 2020 University of Connecticut School of Law Library hosted a webinar and meeting on Dismantling Bias

Another tradition is providing an annual Legal Research Instruction Program. The 2021 program will start on March 17th.  Suffolk University School of Law Library will round out the programing by hosting the meeting for spring 2021.  The Education Committee is soliciting ideas from members for topics or suggestions on ways to improve the format or delivery of these LLNE’s educational programs. Please reach to the Co-Directors Maureen Quinlan and Jessica Panella.

Update from the Education Committee

The first thing I ever wrote professionally was in the LLNE newsletter entitled, “I Didn’t realize I needed a Nametag: And Other Confessions of a First Time AALL Annual Meeting Attendee. I was able to attend my first national meeting in 2007 thanks to the LLNE scholarship and writing the piece was a big deal to me.

Rereading the piece, I am struck by my enthusiasm – and how cliché it all reads, I was not providing new and insightful comments. But, it does remind me of the value of continuing to expand and renew our knowledge as knowledge professionals. And even for those of us with more experience, everything is new to someone.

As the newer co-Education Director (Can we pause and marvel at the fancy title) with Maureen Quinlan, I agreed to run because of the value of education for all members of our organizations.

Now, in a pandemic we have to rethink how we educate and connect members while keeping our libraries afloat. Somewhere I read that we need to remember we’re not working from home, we’re working from home during a pandemic. Now, many of us are also staffing open libraries. Its daunting, emotional work. Our members are also furloughed, laid off or job hunting. How can we help them and their professional development? So if you have ideas for education, or ways LLNE can assist members, please let Maureen, I or any member of the LLNE Board know.

Jessica Panella

jessica.panella@uconn.edu

Report from the LLNE Education Committee (October 2020)

Report from the LLNE Education Committee
Co-Chairs Jessica Panella & Maureen Quinlan

The Law Library at the University of Connecticut School of Law graciously agreed to host a virtual fall 2020 LLNE Conference. The topic was Dismantling Bias. It was the third virtual LLNE conference. LLNE had hosted a spring 2020 virtual meeting in April and the fall 2018 conference was a webinar. Plans are underway for conferences during 2021.

LLNE & SNELLA Present “Dismantling Bias” Fall 2020 Virtual Meeting

The University of Connecticut School of Law Library is proud to host the LLNE & SNELLA Fall 2020 Virtual Conference on October 16, 2020. The conference is free to attend and registration is now open.

As law libraries continue to develop programs and initiatives relating to equity, diversity, and inclusion, the conference will focus on manifestations of bias within law libraries and the role of libraries in dismantling that bias. Sessions will increase participants’ knowledge of bias, deepen their understanding of different forms of bias, and identify biases within law libraries and collections. Being an election year as well as the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, the conference will also examine biases and barriers to voting, as well as libraries’ role in overcoming those barriers.

Participants of the virtual conference will come away with an increased ability to:

  • Address their own personal biases
  • Recognize biases within their communities, law libraries, and collections
  • Identify potential ways in which libraries can eliminate voter suppression
  • Discuss potential solutions on how law libraries can continue these conversations at their own institutions

To learn more about the virtual conference, visit our LibGuide.

Save the date for the LLNE Spring Meeting!

Dear LLNE friends and colleagues, 

The spring LLNE meeting is going to be at Boston College Law School—this is a “save the date” announcement.   

The conference will be on Tuesday, April 28, 2020, and the theme is Well-being and Mindfulness in the Legal Profession.  We will have speakers from the Mindfulness in Law Society, from the SJC Well-Being Committee, from Lawyers Concerned for Lawyers, Boston firms, schools, etc.  Some listening, some practicing–a day to learn and recharge your spirits.  Details about registration to follow.  

Thank you and enjoy the week. 

Peace, Filippa and the BC Law Library Team

Education Committee News

By Brian Flaherty and Ellen Phillips, LLNE Education Committee

Continuing with a great tradition of education and service, LLNE is again running their “Legal Research Instruction Program,” helping New England librarians learn about legal research. For the past two years the class has run six weeks:

  1. General Introduction and Secondary Sources
  2. Caselaw Research
  3. Statutory Research
  4. Administrative Law Research
  5. Business and Transactional Material
  6. Putting it all together.

Traditionally, each week has been taught in person by a different volunteer from LLNE.  This year, we decided to try putting one of the classes online: Susan Vaughn and Brian Flaherty put together an online class for Caselaw research.

This year’s class was slated to start on March 14th – but due to the snow storm the start date was moved to March 21st.  There are 16 people enrolled, including some Simmons students, and folks from public, academic, and law firm libraries.

Many thanks to the folks who have generously volunteered time to make this great idea into a continuing reality.  They are:

Coordinator: Brian Flaherty, Teachers (in the order of classes taught): Brian Flaherty from New England Law,  Susan Vaughn from Boston College Law School, Jessica Pisano Jones from Social Law Library, AJ Blechner from Harvard University Law School, and Elliott Hibbler from Northeastern University Law School. Education Committee: Greg Ewing from Suffolk Law, Brian Flaherty from New England Law, Elliot Hibbler (Education Committee Co-Chair) from Northeastern University Law School, Bonnie Gallagher from Connecticut State Library, Jessica Lundgren from Maine State Law & Legislative Reference Library, Ellen Phillips (Education Committee Co-Chair) from University of New Hampshire School of Law, and Susan Vaughn from Boston College Law School. Also, huge thanks to Rick Buckingham and Suffolk University Law School Library for hosting this program for the third year in a row!

Legal Research Instruction Program – Call for Volunteers

Do you know a lot about legal research? Do you want to share your knowledge with others?

If the answer is yes, then consider volunteering to teach a section of the Legal Research Instruction Program. Currently LLNE needs volunteers to teach Statutes, Administrative Law, as well as Transactional & Business Law this spring. There is also a need for substitute instructors who can fill in at the last minute if needed.

The course is taught by different law librarians from the membership of LLNE, with a different librarian teaching each section. Brian Flaherty from New England Law oversees the program and is there to lend support for all of the sessions.

The course runs on six Tuesday evenings from March 14 to April 25, 2017 (no class on 4/18) from 5:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at Suffolk Law in Boston.

Teaching legal research is a great way to contribute to the field of law librarianship while developing your teaching skills. Please consider volunteering your time for this great program. Contact Brian Flaherty for more information.​

Exciting News about the LLNE Legal Research Instruction Program

By Ellen Phillips, LLNE Education Committee Co-Chair

Each Spring LLNE offers a six-week legal research instruction program for librarians in the New England area who would like to learn about law librarianship. For many years, this unique course has been offering instruction in various legal topics.

Beginning this year, one class of the Legal Research Instruction Program (LRIP), the section on Case Law, will be taught online. The rest of the classes will be held in person on Tuesday evenings at Suffolk Law in Boston as it has been for the past two years.

Each topic is taught by academic law librarians who are members of LLNE and is overseen by Reference Librarian Brian Flaherty from New England Law.

Currently Brian, along with Susan Vaughn, a legal information librarian from Boston College Law Library, is working together to create a lesson plan to teach caselaw online.  All of the instructors volunteer to donate their time to participate in LRIP, and the students have the benefit of being taught by a variety of information professionals who are also experts in their field.

Class participants are varied in their background and career goals. The class traditionally has an even mix of public, academic, and law firm librarians, as well as the occasional pupil who is considering library school. This ensures a lively mix of skills and experience, but it was noted that the majority of the participants are from the greater Boston area. It is hoped that by offering a hybrid format, LLNE will be able to encourage librarians who live further away to consider attending.

This year’s Legal Instruction class will run from March 14th through April 25th. Classes will not be held on April 18th. A description the program is available at the LLNE website. The deadline to register is Friday, March 7th.

The Education Committee is excited about this change and welcomes any feedback. The members of the committee are Greg Ewing, Brian Flaherty, Bonnie Gallagher, Elliott Hibbler, Jessica Lundgren, Ellen Phillips, and Susan Vaughn.