LLNE Members Speaking at New England Clinical Conference this Friday!

 The New England Clinical Conference is being held this Friday (10/12) in Providence, RI.

I am especially proud because a panel of law librarians (all members of LLNE!) will be presenting at it. Jordan Jefferson from Yale Law School, Anne Rajotte from University of Connecticut Law School, Ana Isabel Delgado Valentin from Suffolk University Law School and I will be presenting on Re‐envisioning Collaboration, Law Library Services, and Experiential Education.

Here is a link to the Agenda and to Registration.

Nicole P. Dyszlewski

Research/Access Services Librarian

Roger Williams University School of Law Library

LLNE Logo Design Contest! Final Deadline May 22, 2018

The final deadline for the LLNE Logo Design Contest is approaching!

Be sure to submit all your awesome designs by next Tuesday May 22, 2018 to lawlibne@gmail.com !

***Remember***

o   Participants may submit an UNLIMITED amount of designs

o   Participants may COLLABORATE with colleagues

o   A current LLNE member may SPONSOR someone outside the membership

For more detailed rules, please follow this link.

Any questions regarding the contest, can be addressed to the LLNE Logo Redesign Task Force:

Rebecca Bearden: rebecca.bearden@uconn.edu

Emma Wood: emma.wood@umassd.edu

Ana Isabel Delgado Valentín: adelgadovalentin@suffolk.edu

** For assistance with format requirements, please email the task force contacts above**

LLNE Logo Design Contest: Call for Submissions

LLNE Logo Design Contest

Call for Submissions

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS: May 8th, 2018

Law Librarians of New England is seeking an innovative, forward-thinking logo to represent our membership.  The ideal entry will be an eye-catching design that incorporates our organization name, acronym, and/or recognizable image that embodies our geographical region or profession.  Color and creativity are welcome!

Eligibility and Contest Rules:

  1. All participants must be current members of Law Librarians of New England (LLNE) or someone sponsored by a member.
  2. Members or those sponsored by a member may submit an unlimited amount of submissions or collaborate on submissions with colleagues.
  3. Each logo design submitted must fulfill the specifications listed below. Design flexibility is key so that the logo may be incorporated into various formats and media.
  4. The logo(s) must be your original design(s). Entrants must certify that they are not violating copyright or the work of another.
  5. The contest deadline is May 8th, 2018.
  6. Members will vote for their favorite design through Survey Monkey.
  7. LLNE reserves the right to keep the existing logo.
  8. All entries will be judged in comparison to the current logo.
  9. Entrants transfer all logo rights to LLNE.

Logo Format Guidelines

  • Preferred: Vector EPS (Scalable Vector Graphic Format) file, i.e. Adobe Illustrator. This

format allows the art to be resized without compromising the quality of the image.

  • Other Accepted formats: JPEG & This format shall be submitted in 300 dpi and at

least 4” by 4” in size.

  • Entries must be scalable

How to Submit Your Logo:

  1. Submissions must be emailed to lawlibne@gmail.com
  2. Please use LOGO DESIGN ENTRY as the subject of your email.
  3. Please attach all logo images in your submission email. Submit in a Zip file, max of 5MB in total.
  4. The submission shall consist of a total of 2 files:
    • (2) EPS
      • Color (CMYK)
      • Black and White (100% Black, no gray)
    • OR
    • (2) JPEG or PNG
      • Color
      • Black and White (100% Black, no gray)
  5. Include your contact information in the body of your email.
  6. LLNE will acknowledge receipt of your entry, and the winner will be notified via email.
  7. LLNE will not be responsible for non-receipt of entries.

Prize:

The winner will receive a prize of $50.

Fine Print:

In the event that there are not enough logo submissions or the quality of submissions are insufficient, LLNE reserves the right to terminate the contest and seek alternative designers.

 

Helpful Resources

General Logo Ideas:

https://99designs.com/blog/resources/logo-design-software/

https://www.canva.com/

https://www.graphicsprings.com/

https://resources.goanimate.com/6-best-logo-maker-and-creation-tools/

Public Domain Images:

https://www.pexels.com/public-domain-images/

https://pixabay.com/

http://guides.library.ucla.edu/c.php?g=180361&p=1185834

About Format:

http://www.thelogofactory.com/logo-file-formats-quick-reference-guide/

http://www.thelogofactory.com/logo-file-formats-a-diy-design-clients-guide/

http://kettlefirecreative.com/logo-file-format-jpg-png-eps-pdf-ai/

Good luck and thank you for your participation!

 

-The LLNE Logo Redesign Task Force

 

Rebecca Bearden

Technical Services Librarian

UCONN School of Law Library

39 Elizabeth Street, Hartford, CT 06105

860-570-5011

rebecca.bearden@uconn.edu

 

Ana Isabel Delgado Valentín

Legal Research Librarian

Suffolk University Law School

John Joseph Moakley Law Library

120 Tremont Street, 7th Floor, Boston, MA 02108

(617) 573-8187

adelgadovalentin@suffolk.edu

 

Emma Wood

Assistant Librarian

UMass Dartmouth Law Library

333 Faunce Corner Road, Dartmouth, MA 02747

508-985-1128

emma.wood@umassd.edu

 

Harvard hosting Fair Use Week Symposium

Harvard’s Office of Scholarly Communication is pleased to share registration information on the fifth annual Fair Use Week symposium, “Tried and True: Fair Use Tales for the Telling” that we will be hosted at Harvard on March 1!

The conference will feature a community of librarians, artists, scholars, lawyers, archivists, and other leading fair use experts in a day of panels and discussions. Featuring Kenneth Crews (keynote), Laura Quilter, Chris Bavitz, Zena Agha, Rebekah Modrak, Brandon Butler, Pia Hunter, and more! Its a free, day-long event of fair use art, tech, food, and fun!

We would love to have you join us! For more information and to register please visit https://5th-anniversary-fair-use-week.eventbrite.com. If you have questions, please contact Emily Kilcer at emily_kilcer@harvard.edu. And follow us online on Twitter: @Fairuseweek and #FairUseWeek

Posted on behalf of LLNE Continuing Education Scholarship recipient Jason Eiseman:

Thanks to a generous Continuing Education Scholarship from LLNE I attended my first 2017 Digital Library Federation Forum (DLF Forum) and National Digital Stewardship Alliance’s Digital Preservation Conferences this October.

The Digital Library Foundation is “a robust and ever more diverse and inclusive community of practitioners who advance research, learning, social justice, and the public good through the creative design and wise application of digital library technologies.” Their main event every year is the Digital Library Forum.

The forum includes a wide variety of practitioners who work throughout academia. This included, and I had the opportunity to meet, a number of librarians, IT professionals, faculty, and researchers all interested in the “wise application of digital library technologies.”

Before getting to the actual content of the sessions I think it’s worth noting the unique structure of the conference. Each time block had multiple sessions. Each session had an overarching topic associated with it, and three or more curated presentations related to that topic. In other words the sessions might not be a coordinated and cohesive presentation but rather multiple curated presentations on a topic.

In addition to more traditional panels, there were also workshops which were dedicated to specific topics that often lasted more than one session block as well as working breakfasts and lunches organized by particular DLF groups that served to educate people about the work of those groups, plan for the coming year, and generally discuss a particular topic.

I should also note, one of the great things about DLF was shared community notetaking and material posted to the Open Science Framework . This will make it very easy to review my notes and share relevant material with others. Audience members at every session were encouraged to take notes in the community documents. This also made it much easier to pay attention to the presentation without feeling that I had to take copious notes.

Content-wise the first thing that struck me was how dedicated this professional conference was to the cause of social justice. However, this was often not simply some high-minded ideal discussed abstractly but how this might, would, could or should work in practice was often addressed, even if we didn’t arrive at a definitive answer.

For example, the first session I attended discussed ‘labor’ in digital libraries. I was impressed by how this session, particularly the first presentation, tackled issues of gender and culture head on, but also in such a practical way including discussions about ways to make employee labor on digital scholarship initiatives more visible. Similar themes would appear often throughout the conference – the following links provide two of a number of examples: https://osf.io/x972e/, m5d.

The conference, however, did also include it’s share of practical and techie sessions – many of which were of great relevance. The outreach session included a number of practical approaches one could take. One group discussed their use of Zooniverse to help use a volunteer community to classify old real estate documents. Other libraries are using it to transcribe historical documents like banking records and U.S. Civil War messages.

Finally, there were a number of hot topics which seemed to generate a lot of interest. These hot topic areas are discussed in DLF Groups that appear to be very active and involved in a number of important projects. I attended a number of sessions with the DLF Pedagogy Group and Assessment Group. Just sitting in on their sessions discussing what they’ve been working on proved incredibly valuable. The Assessment group has also created a Digitization Cost Calculator, which is a great resource for digitization projects. We also discussed analytics, and even how to assess the reach of digitized collections and repository items.

The NDSA Digital Preservation conference was a separate conference that began after the DLF Forum. The highlights of the Digital Preservation conference, for me, was the chance to catch up with Legal Information Preservation Alliance (LIPA) Executive Director Margie Maes and attend a great session that included Sharon Bradley from the Library at the University of Georgia School of Law. She was discussing legal issues around digital preservation.

I would highly recommend DLF to other librarians. While law librarians were few and far between the content was still relevant. Discussions of digital humanities, data, digital libraries, institutional repositories, and similar issues cut across all different types of libraries. Law librarians would do well to explore DLF and similar conferences to get different perspectives on how we might approach some of our work. I certainly valued my time there and appreciate LLNE for affording me the opportunity to make it happen.

ANHLL Invites LLNE Members: Monday, October 16th in NH

Interested in hearing from the people behind the editorial enhancements in Westlaw?  The Association of New Hampshire Law Librarians is having a meeting on Monday, October 16th at 2:00pm at McLane Middleton in Manchester and invites LLNE members to join them. Their speakers (via videoconference) are from Westlaw: Bob Smits for KeyCite questions, plus someone from the headnote writing group and the classification group.

If you are an LLNE member interested in attending, please contact Mary Searles at msearles@courts.state.nh.us .

From LLNE Scholarship Winner, Jessica Almeida

My AALL Conference Journey

I had the great fortune of receiving a scholarship through LLNE to attend the AALL conference in Austin.  As I write this, I am flying home from Austin filled with new ideas and new opportunities for further collaboration.  As a first-time attendee, I had no idea what to expect.  So, I asked every law librarian I knew for advice.  I joined the AALL Host Program, so I could ask the librarian I was paired with for advice.  I scoured over the schedule and planned my time down to the minute.  I got new business cards and packed comfortable shoes.  After four amazing and exhausting days in Austin, I know that these takeaways will contribute to my development as a professional.

At every program I attended, I took away something meaningful.  Working in public services, I gravitated toward programs where I learned how to put together successful DYI marketing materials and curate interesting social media content.  I also learned about how to better serve our transgender patrons and how to make the library more accessible after hours.  Throughout the conference, I tried to fully participate, whether through discussion, tweeting during presentations and events, or engaging passerbys during poster sessions.

I found attending the roundtables gave me a greater perspective on how our little library stacks up in the larger world of law libraries.  I was also able to gain insight into innovative programs that other libraries are adopting as well as shared my own experiences.

One of my unexpected favorite sessions of the conference was a discussion den where a small group of women discussed raising families, working full time, and making time for professional development.  Being six months pregnant with my second child, this discussion really resonated with me.

For me, the greatest part of the conference was all the wonderful law librarians I met and spoke to.  In all honesty, I am a bit shy.  Four days of attempting to initiate conversations can be a little overwhelming.  But I want to thank all the wonderful librarians who took the time to speak with me.  From the law librarians on the plane and the shuttle bus to all the RIPS and LISP members who I only knew through email as well as all the LLNE members who introduced themselves or remembered me from previous meetings.  Thank you.  Your kindness and generosity helped make my first AALL conference a success.